A Kransky for your thoughts

A Kransky battered sav for your thoughts

Questions and answers Photo GalleryMedical Fun Facts

Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce Gary Lum
Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce

Last week (Tuesday) I was in Melbourne participating in a meeting. I got back into Canberra just after 6 pm and even though I had prepared in my mind to make a salad, I was tired and just wanted to eat something without cooking. I stopped at the Jamison Takeaway and bought a battered sav, a couple of potato scallops and a serve of hot chips.

The following day I went to see my ‘potato scallop-loving’ colleagues and mentioned the battered sav. The question arose, “How to make a battered sav better?”. We discussed a few options and finally arrived at the Kransky sausage. The Kransky sausage has its origins in Europe while etymologically, the word Kransky appears to be Australian. The next question was, “What sauce should a Kransky battered sav be served with?”. My friend with the greatest desire for battered savs, said in her mind, tomato sauce is the only sauce. I know that tomato sauce is a favourite of hers, she keeps a supply in a refrigerator at work. I also thought the battered sav should be served with coleslaw which turned my mind to cabbage.

On Friday, at the Canberra Hospital and Health Services, I shared my food challenge thoughts with a colleague including the cabbage conundrum. As I was about to suggest sauerkraut, she came up with the brilliant food fusion notion of Kim chi. Given my proclivity to combining cuisines, I thought this was a great suggestion. I needed to seek out some Kim chi. The other sauce I thought might go well with the Kransky battered sav was some wasabi aioli.

So today my mission was to get some Kransky sausages, some Kim chi, wasabi and pickled ginger. I had almost everything else I needed in the flat.

If you want the recipe you can find it at my food blog Yummy Lummy.

I went for a walk around Lake Ginninderra after the grocery shopping and enjoyed the blossoms that have bloomed even more since the last visit I made last week.

Photographs

Tuesday night takeaway

A battered sav, a few potato scallops and a serve of hot chips

Battered sav, hot chips and potato scallops Gary Lum
Battered sav, hot chips and potato scallops

Friday night quesadilla

On Friday night I made a simple bacon instant noodles quesadilla for tea and served it with some avocado and sour cream

Bacon instant noodle quesadilla Gary Lum
Bacon instant noodle quesadilla
Bacon instant noodle quesadilla with avocado and sour cream dip Gary Lum
Bacon instant noodle quesadilla with avocado and sour cream dip

Blossoms and a bee on Lake Ginninderra

Blossoms and a bee on Lake Ginninderra Gary Lum
Blossoms and a bee on Lake Ginninderra
Blossoms and a bee on Lake Ginninderra Gary Lum
Blossoms and a bee on Lake Ginninderra

Raisin toast

From Everbean Espresso Bar

Raisin toast with butter Gary Lum
Raisin toast with butter

Burrito bowl with pulled pork

From Guzman Y Gomez

Guzman Y Gomez burrito bowl with pulled pork Gary Lum
Guzman Y Gomez burrito bowl with pulled pork

Kransky in the deli

Kransky sausages Gary Lum
Kransky sausages

Kim chi from the Asian grocer

Kim chi
Kim chi

Kransky battered sav with Japanese and Korean tones

Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce Gary Lum
Kransky battered savs served with coleslaw, wasabi aioli, Kim chi, pickled ginger and tomato sauce

Questions and answers

Why do you like battered savs?

Well I mean who wouldn’t love a battered sav. A battered sav is an iconic Australian food much like a meat pie or a vanilla slice.

Is the battered sav a euphemism for anything?

Well of course it is. It wouldn’t be Australia if we didn’t imply a sexual aspect to something so phallic.
The best example of this was made famous by Roy and HG.

If you want more from Roy and HJ check out their new podcast. I listen to them every Saturday evening.

What is the next food challenge?

I believe I need to begin a diet. Seriously, I need to lose weight.

Medical Fun Facts

A new show drops at 7 pm on Monday 11 September 2017 (Canberra time). This week’s show is about hæmaturia or blood in your urine.

Click on the thumbnail above and you'll be taken to the show notes. It will be available after the show drops. Gary Lum
Click on the thumbnail above and you’ll be taken to the show notes. It will be available after the show drops.

Other posts you may enjoy

Footy food round up for the 2017 State of Origin series

Maybe I shouldn’t celebrate with food!

Kensington Pride Mangoes in August! Seriously?

 

Please follow me on Facebook

20 thoughts on “A Kransky for your thoughts

  1. A_Boleyn Reply

    Battered savs aren’t commonly seen in my ‘neck of the woods’. The closest thing I can think of are the carnival food ‘corn dogs’ which would be some type of sausage dipped in cornmeal batter and deep fried. Great served with a flavourful mustard. They’re mostly a summer snack food/bbq or picnic dish, I think, and easily purchased in the frozen food aisle at most grocery stores, and finished off in the oven.

    I like the look of those kransky’s. Our area has a lots of German, Eastern European immigrants, from the 60s on, I think, so our delis abound in smoked sausages of every nationality. My dad loved debrecener/debreziner, a smoked Hungarian sausage.

    • garydlum Post author

      Over here we call corn dogs, Dagwood dogs or Pluto pups. Likewise, they are usually carnival food. The batter is a lot thicker and they are served on a stick. Battered savs are found in fish’n’chip takeaway places and usually cooked to order.
      I love a good sausage, especially a smokey one with lots of flavour.

    • garydlum Post author

      Cool. Thank you very much 😃😃😃

  2. Kris Reply

    Gary, I do enjoy reading your posts. I always learn things!! I looked up the ‘Battered savs’ and found another Aussie wp blog!!! https://thingsaussieslike.wordpress.com/tag/battered-sav/
    Fun fun fun. I also get how you don’t want to cook some days. Today, I did not want to cook and pulled some pie things from the freezer. They’d been in there too long. Ate them anyway–
    NOTE: I am not a fan of Kim chi..or sauerkraut.

    • garydlum Post author

      Thanks Kris, I wish I could say I want to cook every night, but you know after a busy day, sometimes, the temptation of something greasy and starchy takes over.
      The battered sav has a long history in Australia, I can remember seeing them in fish’n’chip shops when I was a little boy.

    • Kris

      I try to keep ‘healthy’ type things around, but with one person the produce tends to go bad faster than if I am cooking for a family. Mum can’t process a lot of foods, so I miss rice and pasta (bad for Diabetes anyway!!) and many sorts of veggies.

    • garydlum Post author

      Eating healthfully when there is only one or two people can be difficult when produce is expensive and when it goes off quickly. I wish I had a larger freezer.

    • garydlum Post author

      I don’t mind sauerkraut, and I’m getting to like Kim chi more but it depends on the quality of the Kim chi.

    • garydlum Post author

      I don’t know how old the term is but I’ve known about battered savs from my childhood.

    • garydlum Post author

      It did taste good Sue. I like the texture and mouth feel of the noodles as I bite through the grilled tortillas.

    • garydlum Post author

      No, that’s all I used with the quesadilla but with the Kransky I mixed wasabi and aioli.

Go on, leave a comment, you know you want to